SHINGLES 1

http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/patient-ed/adults/downloads/fs-shingles.pdf

http://www.cdc.gov/shingles/about/overview.html

http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/vpd-vac/shingles/vacc-need-know.htm#protection

Shingles is caused by the varicella virus, the same virus that causes chicken pox. It stays dormant in the body after the chicken pox resolves and for whatever reason may in later life cause inflammation along a nerve and a blistered rash known as shingles. The rash typically involves only one side of the body, and will resolve in 7 to 10 days, when it will scab over and then the scabs will fall off.
However, a significant number of people will have pain in the affected area that persists. This is called post herpetic neuralgia and can be very uncomfortable. Shingles can also affect the eye and cause major problems there as well.
ONE IN THREE PEOPLE IN THE US WILL DEVELOP SHINGLES IN THEIR LIFETIME. It is more common as you get older.
Thankfully there is a vaccine that is about 67% effective in preventive the pain after shingles. The one currently available is called Zostavax.

The following is from the Centers for Disease Control:

“Who Should Get the Vaccine
CDC recommends Zostavax for use in people 60 years old and older to prevent shingles. This is a one-time vaccination. There is no maximum age for getting the shingles vaccine.
Anyone 60 years of age or older should get the shingles vaccine, regardless of whether they recall having had chickenpox or not. Studies show that more than 99% of Americans ages 40 and older have had chickenpox, even if they don't remember getting the disease.
Shingles vaccine is available in pharmacies and doctors' offices. Talk with your healthcare professional if you have questions about shingles vaccine”