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SHINGLES 3

FOR AGES 50 AND OLDER

Shingrix reduces the risk of shingles and PHN by more than 90% in people 50 and older. CDC recommends the vaccine for healthy adults 50 and older.

NOTE: CDC RECOMMENDATIONS DOES NOT GUARANTEE INSURANCE COVERAGE OR PAYMENT.

There is no maximum age for getting Shingrix.
If you had shingles in the past, you can get Shingrix to help prevent future occurrences of the disease. There is no specific length of time that you need to wait after having shingles before you can receive Shingrix, but generally you should make sure the shingles rash has gone away before getting vaccinated.
You can get Shingrix whether or not you remember having had chickenpox in the past. Studies show that more than 99% of Americans 40 years and older have had chickenpox, even if they don’t remember having the disease. Chickenpox and shingles are related because they are caused by the same virus (varicella zoster virus). After a person recovers from chickenpox, the virus stays dormant (inactive) in the body. It can reactivate years later and cause shingles.
If you had Zostavax in the recent past, you should wait at least eight weeks before getting Shingrix. Talk to your healthcare provider to determine the best time to get Shingrix.

Who Should Not Get Shingrix?
The side effects of the Shingrix are temporary, and usually last 2 to 3 days. While you may experience pain for a few days after getting Shingrix, the pain will be less severe than having shingles and the complications from the disease.
You should not get Shingrix if you:
• have ever had a severe allergic reaction to any component of the vaccine or after a dose of Shingrix
• tested negative for immunity to varicella zoster virus. If you test negative, you should get chickenpox vaccine.
• currently have shingles
• currently are pregnant or breastfeeding. Women who are pregnant or breastfeeding should wait to get Shingrix.
If you have a minor acute (starts suddenly) illness, such as a cold, you may get Shingrix. But if you have a moderate or severe acute illness, you should usually wait until you recover before getting the vaccine. This includes anyone with a temperature of 101.3°F or higher.